The Revolution Began with A Fight Against Illegal Searches and Seizures

Whether left, right, middle, above, below–every single American should support Senator Rand Paul’s filibuster tonight.  Republican, democratic. . . it just doesn’t matter.  The U.S. government exists to protect us, not to spy on us.

The fourth amendment to the U.S. Constitution is pretty clear:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

It’s also well worth remembering that our American Revolution began with a three-hour oration delivered by James Otis in February, 1761, protesting the unconstitutional British writs of assistance.

Here’s John Adams explaining the power of Otis’s protest:

But Otis was a flame of fire!—with a promptitude of classical allusions, a depth of research, a rapid summary of historical events and dates, a profusion of legal authorities, a prophetic glance of his eye into futurity, and a torrent of impetuous eloquence, he hurried away every thing before him. American independence was then and there born; the seeds of patriots and heroes were then and there sown, to defend the vigorous youth, the non sine Diis animosus infans. Every man of a crowded audience appeared to me to go away, as I did, ready to take arms against writs of assistance. Then and there was the first scene of the first act of opposition to the arbitrary claims of Great Britain. Then and there the child Independence was born. In fifteen years, namely in 1776, he grew up to manhood, and declared himself free.

Senator Paul is our flame of fire.

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